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Introduction

Operation WaterIn cities and towns across the United States, fire departments have had years of experience creating adequate water supplies for fighting structural fires . Networks of fire hydrants and water mains provide quick access to a plentiful supply of municipal water.

But what happens if you remove the hydrants and water mains, spread the homes and businesses far apart, add county roads and terrain, and dot the land with other types of structures? This is a more realistic picture of rural areas and the wildland-urban interface, and it is in these areas that water supply and distribution present an urgent challenge.

In this website, we'll discuss the process of planning that needs to take place to ensure adequate water supply and distribution in your region.

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Fire Chief:

"Our district is just about bone dry; we have no lakes, ponds or streams to supply us with water. But after serious consideration, we devised a strategy based on cisterns now all our homes are protected against fire."
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Fire Chief:

"Homeowner Insurance gets pretty expensive in the country. Since we've put in dry hydrants , insurance rates have come down about 40%"
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Fire Chief:

"Here in Forsyth County, Georgia, we've been using dry hydrants for more than seven years. This saves our county around 2000 gallons of water a year."
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Fire Chief:

"Simply by learning how to use our water tenders more effectively, we improved operations by 50%."
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Fire Chief:

"Until last year, we always had to scramble to locate equipment to fight any multi-structure fire. Now we know how much water we need, where it's located...and we have a mutual aid agreement that ensures us additional equipment to fight fires."
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